Bargello

Bargello

While working with polymer clay I found a tutorial on how-to make items with a Bargello-look.

Then I made a little research to know what Bargello is (links see below):
It seems, that the first ‘Bargello craft’ was embroidery, but then the quilters worked Bargello-looking quilts, the polymer clay people made those items with a Bargello-look and the stampers and cardmaking people use this technique on paper. And I made my Bargello digitally as you can see on the picture ;-)
What a versatile technique ;-)


Links:
Embroidery:
Wikipedia: English entry for ‘Bargello’

Defining Bargello

How-to make Bargello needlework:
Bargello Work
Bargello needlepoint

Quilting:
How To Make Bargello Quilt

Polymer Clay:
Tutorial on how-to make items with a Bargello-look
Bargello Swap
Tutorial on how to make a Bargello pattern as cane and as sheet

Stamped Paper:
Bargello (English) (with explaining pictures)

Letter stencils

Letter stencils

Rosie showed her beautiful carved stamps and mentioned that she wants to carve letters too.
I prefer to use letter stencils, because I can use them in such a flexible way.
On the first photo you see a page from an artist book of mine yet to be finished. It has the theme ‘Colour’ and I stenciled the word ‘Pink’. On the other photo beneath you can see the stencil.

This is how I did it:
You’ll need:

  • Plain paper
  • Different fonts on your computer
  • Clear tape
  • Sharp knife, like an Xacto knife

What to do:

  1. Print the word you’re interested in in the requested size on paper.
    Note: You can use just one font, but I found different fonts for every letter more appealing.
    Note: Best are big fonts because they are easier to cut out.
  2. Put some clear tape on the print.
  3. Cut the letters carefully.
    Note: The tape makes the paper sturdier, so that the cutting is a little easier.
  4. Stencil your word wherever you want (paper, cardboard, fabric, glass, wood etc.).
    Note: I painted with a marker on the clear tape round the letters and smeared them with my fingers onto the paper.

Letter stencils The tape makes the paper not only sturdy, but also quite waterproof, so that you can use it several times with nearly every kind of colours. If necessary you can put tape on both sides of the paper prior to the cutting.

You can find a similar tutorial on instructables.com for making your own freezer paper and your own freezer paper stencil. I guess it is better for making bigger stencils, but I haven’t tried it.


Links:
Rosie’s carved stamps

Eraser Stamps Tutorials
Photo Stamps Tutorial

My Artist Book

Freezer paper and stencil tutorial

Photo Stamps

Photo Stamps

I already presented links on eraser carving, but perhaps you want to go a step further and make stamps from your own photos?
I found a tutorial on how to prepare your photos for carving stamps.
The preparation of the photos is similar to the tutorial on making your own digital stamps (and while we’re at it why not making stencils from your own photos? ;-))
On the picture you see a stamp template I made from a photo from a magazine.
Not yet cut, first I must find a big eraser ;-)

 


Links:
Prepping Photos for Carving
Carving 101

art-e-zine: a cornucopia for artists
Make your own digital stamps
Stencil Art

Here at unikatissima:
Eraser Stamps

Inkjet Transfer Stamping

Inkjet Transfer Stamping

As I mentioned before, I don’t often stamp. Therefore I found the tutorial on how to make stamps with an inkjet printer very interesting.

I haven’t tried it yet and possibly I never will, because printer ink is also expensive, but who knows? Because I really want to ‘stamp’ the image on the photo and I’m sure that I wont carve it from an eraser ;-)

 


Links:
Craft Chi: Inkjet Transfer Stamping

Here at unikatissima:
Eraser Stamps

Fractal Art

Fractal Art

Once I saw some fractals in internet and – as always;-)) – I wanted to create something like this too.
Some researching resulted in finding the Fractal Explorer, a freeware fractal generator.
I created many fractals and everyone was absolutely beautiful.
As I saw them on my screen I was delighted. I then let them be printed as photos in 20 x 30 cm (about 51 x 76 inches) and was thrilled. And in the end, when they were glued to 40 x 60 cm watercolor paper (about 102 x 152 inches) I stood in awe.
Really! :-))

If you like to see my fractals take a look at art (Simply click on the thumbnails to get a (German) description. If you want to enlarge them further, click then on the image.)


Links:
Wikipedia: English entry for ‘fractal’

Fractal Explorer: a freeware fractal generator

Result of Google image search for ‘fractal’

Self-made Landscapes

Self-made Landscapes

While surfing I found wonderful, photo realistic landscapes (see images found by Google).
As a matter of course I wanted to create such landscapes myself ;-))
Searching further, I found Terradreams where eventually I came to know about Terragen, a free scenery generator.
I played around with the program and every time I created a ‘postcard’ I felt like being on holidays ;-)


Links:
Terragen: A free scenery generator

Terradreams: A website dedicated to Terragen with forums, tutorials, links to plug-ins and so on

Droste Effects

Droste Effects

While surfing I found one day images with a so-called Droste effect (examples at flickr).
I was thrilled!
And I wanted to do that too ;-))
At flickr I found the Droste Effect Tutorial where Josh Sommers explaines about everything.
One important hint: Read everything *thoroughly*.
I didn’t and spend a lot of time searching where my problems came from although everything was explained somewhere ;-)
More explanations can be found at Escher’s Droste Print Gallery and their discussions.
Here I took one of my photos and played around with the Droste effect. It was so much fun!


Links:
Wikipedia: Droste Effect

flickr
Droste Effect Tutorial
Escher’s Droste Print Gallery: more explanations
Escher’s Droste Print Gallery Discussions: more explanations