Spool Knitting

Project Gutenberg Spool Knitting

I’m browsing from time to time Project Gutenberg and found last time a book about spool knitting from 1909. They have mittens, bed shoes, a baby ball and much more, all made from I-cords.
It feels to me like a book from the 70th’s ;-))

Perhaps I do a little rummage to play with my knitting spool once more ;-)


Links:
Spool Knitting, by Mary A. McCormack

 

Handspun Newspaper Yarn

Handspun Newspaper Yarn

I’m always interested in articles about weaving and spinning, even though I neither weave nor spin.
But that is the reason why I was so stunned by the tutorial on how to spin newspapers to yarn.
I really would like to try it – one day ;-))


Links:
Handspun Newspaper Yarn

Clothespin bobbins

Clothespin bobbins

Once I found a really good idea on how to make inexpensive bobbins from clothespins.
Later I found more very good ideas at Gabriela Marková’s Kumihimo blog, all entries labelled with ‘Equipment’.
You can use those bobbins very good when making you own Kumihimo cord.

Links:
Learn Intarsia Knitting (the clothespin bobbins are mentioned there)

At Gabriela Marková’s Kumihimo blog:
All entries labelled with ‘Equipment’ (English)

Clothes From Crocheted Medaillons

Clothes From Crocheted Medaillons

Once I found the website of Jessica Tromp.
Hours later I regained consciousness ;-))

It is difficult to say, what I love best, but in the end I decided, that it must be the crochet patterns for/from square medaillons. But make sure to check all the other crochet patterns also (look for ‘crochet PATTERNS’ in the left navigation bar of her website).

Best of all, she designed a gazillion of clothes and each and every one for different women sizes!
In addition she offers basic woman measurement charts for clothing patterns.

I simply don’t find the right words for this site ;-))


Links:
Jessica Tromp:
Crochet patterns for/from square medaillons
Basic woman measurement charts for clothing patterns

Leftover Needlework

Leftover Needlework

I have a lot of yarn and thread rests, some of them quite short and I had no idea, what to do with them (except Freeform needlework as a matter of course ;-)).
And then one day I found an article about the ‘Magic ball’ an article about the ‘Magic ball’ and decided that this is it ;-)
In the bottom line it’s nothing else then taking your short threads and knotting them together (with a weaver’s knot e.g.) to get a long enough thread to knit or crochet or what ever you want to do.
On the photo you see three tests I did: On the item above I simply knotted different strings into a long thread and crocheted. It were quite short strings.
For the item below left I took two skeins of yarn, one green and one rose. I knitted with two threads and knotted them so, that I began working with 2 greens, then a green and a rose, then 2 rose, a green and a rose again and back to 2 greens. That way I got a kind of blend between the two colours.
The item below right is made in the same way, but with one light green and one dark green.

I’m sure that I will get back to this technique again.


Links:
Make your own magic using knotted yarn leftovers: the link isn’t available no more.

At unikatissima’s:
Freeform Needlework
Weaver’s Knot