Bicycle Bottle Holder

Bicycle Bottle Holder

One day my friend asked me, if I have an idea how best to attach his water bottle to his bicycle. I promised him to make him a bottle holder and that’s it: It consists of a cardboard cylinder with bottom and a wrap crocheted from simple package string. I made two cords from the same package string to tie it somewhere to the bicycle.

And that’s how to do it:

  1. Cut a rectangle from cardboard.
    One side must be long enough to go around the bottle plus allowance, the other must be high enough, so that it holds the bottle safely.
  2. If you want the cardboard container to be (quite) waterproof, tape the inside with tape.
    Note: I used clear package tape.
  3. Wrap the cardboard around the bottle and wrap with long strips of tape.
    Hint: If it has to be waterproof, tape the whole cylinder.
    Hint: To make sure, that the cardboard container is not to tight around the bottle, I wrapped the bottle in several layers of old newspapers and wrapped the cardboard around the ‘thickened’ bottle.
  4. Cut a circle from cardboard, optionally tape the to-be inside with tape, too.
  5. Attach the circle with amply applied package tape to the bottom of your cardboard cylinder.
  6. Then you can create the outer container.
    Note: I crocheted it from package string by first crocheting a circle and then simply working straight up. ‘On the way’ I worked some thread eyes for the cords. The cords themselves were made from the same material.
    Hint: It should be easy enough to sew the outer container from a fabric matching your bicycle colours.
  7. The inner cardboard container and the outer crocheted container.
    Bicycle Bottle Holder Bicycle Bottle Holder

     


    Links:
    If a bicycle bottle holder isn’t enough for you, try the Bicycle Handlebar Bag.

    Making Any Sized Crochet Circles (English)
    Häkeln lernen: Runden und Spiralen (German)

    How to make Twisted Cord (English)
    Kordel drehen (German)

YoYo Pin

YoYo Pin

I like yoyo’s, but only recently I tried to make one. And I find it cute.
It is made from shiny polyester fabric and embellished with a little crocheted flower and some embroidered beads (I hate to have polyester on my skin, but I like it for pins and the like, because it is so shiny).


Links:
Yoyo Projects (with explaining pictures)
How to make a Yoyo (with explaining pictures)

The links don’t work anymore, you can find the information here now:
Yoyo Projects (with explaining pictures)
How to make a Yoyo (with explaining pictures)

Polymer Clay Flower Canes

Polymer Clay Flower Canes

This Thursday started its first challenge which theme is ‘fresh’.
When I heard about I thought immediately about the little polymer clay box I made long ago but am still fond of (not least because of its freshness ;-))
It is a little cardboard box that I covered with polymer clay and embellished with self-made flower and leaf canes (for links to tutorials see links below).

 

Polymer Clay Flower Canes On this picture you see one side of the box. The finger isn’t there by accident, but to show how small the box is ;-))

 

Polymer Clay Flower Canes This is a close-up from the lid. You can see the purple Hydrangea-like flowers with the Jellyroll center and the leaves.
I made the transparent cane with the white dots to simulate those white flower tufts often used by florists.

 

Polymer Clay Flower Canes Just a last close-up.

 


Links:
Hydrangea-like flowers
Jellyroll
Leaves

Carving Polymer Clay

Carving Polymer Clay

When working with polymer clay I always found the hints and tips at Glassattic immensely helpful.
They also inspired me to try new things.
On the photo you see a detail of a candle holder that I once made. The yellow part was made from a kind of faux jade, then I carved shallow spirals and filled the carvings with black polymer clay.
Although I didn’t make the candle holder safe enough to be given away, I still love it. I sanded and buffed it thoroughly and it became very smooth, beautiful not only to look at, but also to touch.


Links:
Diane Black writes at Glassattic: “The site has many, many. lessons and projects, techniques (and ideas for variations on them), links to examples, tools that might be used, supply sources, tips for problem-solving, and special kids+beginners page and disabilities page.

It also has information on doing polymer clay as a business (shows, auctions, teaching, etc),. seasonal ideas, mixing media with polymer clay, polymer groups, creativity & inspiration, color mixing and making color blends, etc.”

The following links are examples of the many pages about polymer clay at Glassattic:
Faux Jade from polymer clay
Carving polymer clay
Sanding polymer clay
Buffing polymer clay