Peyote Variations

Peyote Variations

I love the peyote pattern, but sometimes it is nice to make some variations on it.
On the photo you see a detail from one of my Freeform Peyote items where the pink beads form a ‘Peyote-1 drop’ pattern, but the orange and gold part is worked in with a combination of ‘Peyote-1 drop’ and ‘Peyote-2 drop’: the golden beads are wider than the golden, so I made a ‘Peyote-1 drop’ for the golden beads and a ‘Peyote-2 drop’ for the orange beads.


Links:
Making Peyote Stitch Samples Part I (with explaining photos and pictures)
Making Peyote Stitch Samples Part II (with explaining photos and pictures)

Peyote stitch:
About.com: Beadwork: A website with lots of tutorials about beadwork
Basic Beading Stitch Tutorials

Perlenhobby.de: A website with lots of (german) tutorials about beadwork: click on
‘Anleitungen’ in the sidebar left and there select one of the Peyote tutorials

Bargello

Bargello

While working with polymer clay I found a tutorial on how-to make items with a Bargello-look.

Then I made a little research to know what Bargello is (links see below):
It seems, that the first ‘Bargello craft’ was embroidery, but then the quilters worked Bargello-looking quilts, the polymer clay people made those items with a Bargello-look and the stampers and cardmaking people use this technique on paper. And I made my Bargello digitally as you can see on the picture ;-)
What a versatile technique ;-)


Links:
Embroidery:
Wikipedia: English entry for ‘Bargello’

Defining Bargello

How-to make Bargello needlework:
Bargello Work
Bargello needlepoint

Quilting:
How To Make Bargello Quilt

Polymer Clay:
Tutorial on how-to make items with a Bargello-look
Bargello Swap
Tutorial on how to make a Bargello pattern as cane and as sheet

Stamped Paper:
Bargello (English) (with explaining pictures)

Letter stencils

Letter stencils

Rosie showed her beautiful carved stamps and mentioned that she wants to carve letters too.
I prefer to use letter stencils, because I can use them in such a flexible way.
On the first photo you see a page from an artist book of mine yet to be finished. It has the theme ‘Colour’ and I stenciled the word ‘Pink’. On the other photo beneath you can see the stencil.

This is how I did it:
You’ll need:

  • Plain paper
  • Different fonts on your computer
  • Clear tape
  • Sharp knife, like an Xacto knife

What to do:

  1. Print the word you’re interested in in the requested size on paper.
    Note: You can use just one font, but I found different fonts for every letter more appealing.
    Note: Best are big fonts because they are easier to cut out.
  2. Put some clear tape on the print.
  3. Cut the letters carefully.
    Note: The tape makes the paper sturdier, so that the cutting is a little easier.
  4. Stencil your word wherever you want (paper, cardboard, fabric, glass, wood etc.).
    Note: I painted with a marker on the clear tape round the letters and smeared them with my fingers onto the paper.

Letter stencils The tape makes the paper not only sturdy, but also quite waterproof, so that you can use it several times with nearly every kind of colours. If necessary you can put tape on both sides of the paper prior to the cutting.

You can find a similar tutorial on instructables.com for making your own freezer paper and your own freezer paper stencil. I guess it is better for making bigger stencils, but I haven’t tried it.


Links:
Rosie’s carved stamps

Eraser Stamps Tutorials
Photo Stamps Tutorial

My Artist Book

Freezer paper and stencil tutorial

Kumihimo

Kumihimo

Once I took a class for Kumihimo braiding – that is a japanese technique for braiding cords.
I really enjoyed the class and the work with the marudai, but I can’t afford to buy one. And although I found a tutorial on how to make your own marudai I prefer now to work with a cardboard disk. I braided for hours during train journeys. I can’t do this with a marudai ;-)

I didn’t find many instructions on how to make kumihimo cords in internet (see those I found below), so I will present my own.

On the photo you see my cardboard marudai and a braid I’m working on. I changed the pattern several times to get a more interesting appearance.

What you need:

  • 4 threads of yarn in 2 different colours (e.g. 2 red and 2 yellow) (test it e.g. with 100 cm/39 inches)
    Note: in the beginning both threads should be of the same gauge.
  • cardboard marudai disk (not too thin cardboard)
    Note: This is a cardboard disk with a hole in the middle and cuts around.
    For the beginning, 36 12-16 cuts are sufficient, later you may need more depending on the number of threads and the pattern.
    You can use the marudai picture as template to be cut from cardboard.
  • a little weight
    Note: I use mostly some coins in a little plastic bag.
  • quite a lot of patience ;-))

(click or scroll to go to the instructions below)


What you do:
(Click on pictures to enlarge)

Fold the threads in half and knot all together at the fold.
You have now 8 threads, connected to each other at one side.

 

Kumihimo Wedge the threads into the cuts as seen in pic. 1.
The knot is in the middle.

 

Cling your little weight to the knot of the threads. It provides a certain tension on the threads.

 

Kumihimo

 

Kumihimo Braid: Move the threads as seen in the pics 2 and 3 to the desired length.

 

After four moves you must have a ‘real’ cross again, otherwise you made a mistake.
But don’t worry, after a little practise you will see which thread should be moved next.

With 100 cm/39 inches you’re using quite short threads, but they tend to entangle anyhow. Therefore you must pull them free at every round. When the treads become longer, see to it to use some (self-made) bobbins.

The finished braid is a lot shorter than the threads, but I don’t know no factor.

Have fun
(and check the links to find more patterns)

Here are some of my kumihimo cords, made with thin cotton to thick acrylic yarn:

Kumihimo

Kumihimo

 

Kumihimo I worked a lot of cords with different yarns in matching colours, included funky yarns and strands of beads and simply braided them together to get a big necklace:

 

Kumihimo And then I worked several braids with sewing yarn in matching colours, included metallic threads. Every braid has another braiding pattern. They are supposed to be a necklace, but up until know I haven’t finished it yet.

 


Kumihimo Marudai Cardboard marudai template (click picture to enlarge)

 


Links:
Wikipedia: English entry for ‘Marudai’

Wikipedia: English entry for ‘Kumihimo’German entry for ‘Kumihimo’


Self-made Marudai and bobbins:
Tutorial on how to make your own marudai

At Gabriela Marková’s Kumihimo blog:
Check the entries labelled with ‘Equipment’
Kumihimo braids:
Check Gabriela Marková’s Kumihimo blog

An instruction for a Kumihimo braid with 12 threads (with diagrams)

An instruction for a Kumihimo braid with 8 threads (German) (PDF-file) (with diagrams)
An instruction for a Kumihimo braid with 16 threads (German) (PDF-file) (with diagrams)

Diagrams for Kumihimo software, can be used as pattern (with diagrams)

See also how different your braid looks when changing the order of the threads or of moves (with diagrams)
An interesting pattern (with diagrams)

A pattern with 16 threads (with diagrams)

An instruction similar to mine (English) (PDF-file) (with diagrams)

An instruction for a Kumihimo braid with 12 threads (English) (with diagrams)

An instruction for a Kumihimo braid with 16 threads (English) (with diagrams)

An instruction for a Kumihimo braid with 8 threads (English) (with diagrams)

Linklists about Kumihimo:
Squidoo
Shelly Gillmann’s Kumihimo Links

Flower Pounding

Flower Pounding

One day I found a tutorial on flower pounding. It sounded strange to me and I was really surprised what people do to innocent flowers ;-) (we have already seen that people stitch flowers).
Anyhow, the results are stunning!
As you can see on the photo, mine aren’t: I pounded on tissue paper in place of fabric and did something wrong. But this experience showed me that I’m not the woman to wallop little flowers ;-))


Links:
Flower Pounding
Inspiration: Google image results for ‘Flower Pounding’

Here at unikatissima:
Stitched Flowers